Business As Usual

They range from burgeoning tech giants to small producers of specialized applications for smartphones. They also include specialty bakeries and the world’s largest retailer of natural and organic foods.

What these wide varieties of companies have in common is that they have located in Detroit, or soon will.

Indeed, momentum is growing for Michigan’s largest city, which is fast developing a list of assets that are crucial for attracting both traditional and New Economy employers.

Motor City boosters say Twitter chose to open an office in Detroit because of the city’s growing, young and energetic environment. The real-time information network will locate in the Madison Building, a suddenly bustling tech hub and the anchor of what is envisioned as the Woodward Avenue web-centered corridor.

Indeed, momentum is growing for Michigan’s largest city, which is fast developing a list of assets that are crucial for attracting both traditional and New Economy employers

Companies are also coming to the city to take advantage of affordable rents – an important consideration for small and start-up businesses that provide the bulk of the jobs for Michigan residents.

Another important facet is strong neighborhoods, the bedrock of any community. Consider the developing Midtown area, a 2-square-mile area north of downtown that is home to Wayne State University and the Detroit Medical Center as well as a growing population of young and upscale residents.

It’s that demographic that caught the attention of Austin, Texas-based Whole Foods Inc., which plans to open a 20,000-square-foot supermarket in Midtown, providing residents with a much-needed source of fresh food and serving as additional fuel for the area’s revitalization.

Each time a company comes to Detroit, it sparks discussions and headlines about the city’s comeback. At some point, such developments may cease generating as much buzz, because they will merely represent business as usual.

– Mike Turner Freelance Writer